CWM food security

Food Security

Access to affordable, nutritionally adequate food contributes to the primary wellbeing of our communities. A household is considered food secure when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to enough safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy lifestyle.
 

Indicators: Number of people reporting food insecurity
Number of people consuming fruit and vegetables
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Data sources: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance Systems (SAMSS)
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Strategies / Plans: N/A
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Community Plan 2035: Objective 2.1  Healthy, active lifestyles
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Food insecurity

As part of the SAMSS, participants were asked ‘in the last 12 months, were there any times that you ran out of food and you couldn’t afford to buy more’? The proportion answering ‘yes’ to this question have been defined as those reporting food insecurity.

In the 2014-15 SAMSS assessment of food insecurity a total of 827 respondents were interviewed for the City of Onkaparinga and a total of 7167 South Australians (30).

Data analysis

In 2014-15 the proportion of respondents in the City of Onkaparinga that reported food insecurity was 3.9 per cent, which was slightly higher than the proportion of South Australian respondents reporting food insecurity (2.7 per cent) (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Proportion of respondents reporting food insecurity, City of Onkaparinga and South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents reporting food insecurity, City of Onkaparinga and South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

Trend analysis

CWM food insecurity trend analysis

The proportion of respondents who reported food insecurity in 2014-15 was 3.4 per cent less than that reported by City of Onkaparinga respondents in 2008-09 (Figure 1). The proportion of South Australian respondents reporting food insecurity decreased by a much larger 31.1 per cent from 2008-09 to 2014-15. Over time, there has been a tendency for reported food insecurity to be slightly higher in the City of Onkaparinga compared with South Australia.

 

Policy implications

While there has been a reduction in the proportion of residents reporting food insecurity, the City of Onkaparinga will continue to advocate to government and non-government organisations to respond to the economic factors such as employment and mortgage stress, together with social factors such as illness or family breakdown, which could potentially affect food insecurity. The implementations of a number of food and community wellbeing initiatives by the City of Onkaparinga, including Magic Harvest and Oz Food Harvest, have possibly contributed to relieve the effects of food insecurity within the community.

The City of Onkaparinga is also developing a strategic approach to mapping a regional response to food health and security with Flinders University, which will determine what level of food insecurity exists amongst groups in our communities, food health programs offered and potential areas that could be utilised for growing food. 

Fruit and vegetable consumption

According to the Australian Dietary Guidelines the recommended adult daily intake of fruit is two serves every day, and daily vegetable intake is five serves every day (36).

As part of the SAMSS, participants aged 16 years and over were asked ‘how many serves of fruit/vegetables do you eat each day’? In the 2014-15 SAMSS assessment of daily fruit consumption, 696 respondents aged 16 and over were interviewed for the City of Onkaparinga and a total of 5788 South Australians (30). For the assessment of daily vegetable consumption, 693 respondents aged 16 and over were interviewed for the City of Onkaparinga, and a total of 5761 South Australians (30).

Data analysis

Fruit consumption

In 2014-15 only 46.6 per cent of City of Onkaparinga respondents were consuming the recommended two serves of fruit per day, the majority of respondents were not meeting the recommended daily intake (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Proportion of respondents by daily fruit consumption, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by daily fruit consumption, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

Similarly, in 2014-15 South Australians were also not meeting dietary guidelines for daily fruit intake, with only 44.9 per cent of respondents consuming two or more serves of fruit (Figure 3). In 2014-15, the proportion of City of Onkaparinga residents consuming the recommended daily intake of fruit was 1.6 per cent higher than that observed for South Australia. However, there was greater proportion of respondents in the City of Onkaparinga who were not consuming any fruit, when compared with the rest of South Australia (1.2 per cent more).

Figure 3: Proportion of respondents by daily fruit consumption, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15

Proportion of respondents by daily fruit consumption, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

 

Vegetable consumption

In 2014-15 only just over 12 per cent of City of Onkaparinga respondents were consuming the recommended five serves of vegetables per day, the majority of respondents were consuming 2–4 serves of vegetables per day (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Proportion of respondents by daily vegetable consumption, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by daily vegetable consumption, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

In 2014-15 the proportion of South Australians consuming the recommended vegetable intake was 10.8 per cent, which was 1.6 per cent lower than that observed for the City of Onkaparinga (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Proportion of respondents by daily vegetable consumption, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by daily vegetable consumption, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

Trend analysis

CWM fruit and veg consumption trend analysis

Fruit consumption

In 2014-15 there was an increase of 4.7 per cent in the proportion of respondents in the City of Onkaparinga consuming the recommended daily fruit intake compared with 2008-09 (Figure 2). However, in 2014-15 there was actually a slight decrease in the proportion of South Australians consuming the recommended daily intake of fruit consumption when compared with 2008-09 (0.6 per cent less) (Figure 3). Between 2008-09 and 2014-15 there was an increase in the proportion of City of Onkaparinga respondents who did not consume any fruit of 24 per cent (Figure 2). In contrast, the proportion of South Australian respondents who reported not consuming any fruit remained the same between 2008-09 and 2014-15 (Figure 3).

Vegetable consumption

In 2014-15 there were 22.0 per cent more respondents in the City of Onkaparinga consuming the recommended daily vegetable intake compared with 2008-09 (Figure 4). There was however, an increase in the proportion of City of Onkaparinga respondents who reported consuming one serve of vegetables or less (increase of 23.6 per cent) and no vegetables at all (increase of 134.1 per cent) between 2008-09 and 2014-15. There was also a decrease in the proportion of respondents consuming 2-4 serves of vegetables, by 10.8 per cent. 

The proportion of South Australians consuming the recommended daily intake of vegetables in 2014-15 only slightly increased, by 3.9 per cent, when compared with 2008-09 (Figure 5). Similar to that observed for the City of Onkaparinga respondents, there was also an increase in the proportion of South Australian respondents who reported only consuming one serve of vegetables or less (increase of 22.2 per cent) and no change in the proportion who consumed no vegetables between 2008-09 and 2014-15. There was also a decrease in the proportion of South Australian respondents consuming 2-4 serves of vegetables, by 6.0 per cent.

 

Policy implications

While there have been positive trend outcomes over the last seven years, this data still indicates that a greater proportion of residents need to be consuming the recommended daily intake of fruit and vegetables. The City of Onkaparinga has always been committed to increasing community awareness about the benefits of healthy eating and supporting the community through community led initiatives to ensure residents are accessing fresh, healthy food. Some of the current healthy eating initiatives the City of Onkaparinga continue to facilitate and support include Community Gardens, Magic Harvest, Jamie Oliver’s Ministry of Food Pop-up Kitchen in Ramsay Place and the legacy of the previously implemented programs Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL) and the Healthy Active Lifestyles Onkaparinga (HALO).

The City of Onkaparinga will continue to develop and implement healthy eating programs run through schools, communities, neighbourhood and youth centres, and to partner with businesses and education providers to develop and implement programs that teach skills and knowledge to improve residents with food purchasing and preparation behaviours to increase self-sufficiency and healthy food choices. Further initiatives may need to be implemented, including improved advocacy methods to better engage all levels of government to reinstate new, or further develop healthy active lifestyle programs similar to OPAL and HALO, to continue to address the Community Plan Objective 2.1 Healthy, Active Lifestyles and increase the proportion of residents eating the recommended daily fruit and vegetable intake.


 

This indicator is linked to other strategies, plans and targets outlined below:

Government of South Australia South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets: 78. Healthy South Australians: increase the healthy life expectancy of South Australians.
79. Aboriginal healthy life expectancy: increase the average healthy life expectancy of Aboriginal South Australians.  
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Other State Strategies • Right Bite: Health Food and Drink Supply Strategy for South Australian Schools and Preschools
• South Australian Premium Food and Wine From Our Clean Environment, Action Plan Update 2015
• Eat Well Be Active Strategy for South Australia 2011-16
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National Strategies: • National Food Plan: Our food future 2013
• Safe Food Australia: A Guide to the Food Safety Standards
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