CWM healthy weight

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight allows communities to participate more fully and avoid preventable health problems. Overweight and obesity can cause a wide range of debilitating and life-threatening conditions such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke and cancers.
 

Indicators: Number of people undertaking sufficient physical activity
Body Mass Index
line
Data sources: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance Systems (SAMSS)
line
Strategies / Plans: Healthy, Active Lifestyle Strategy 2014-19
Sport and Active Recreation Strategic Management Plan 2014-19
Coast and Natural Resources Strategic Management Plan (under development)
line
Community Plan 2035: Objective 2.1  Healthy, active lifestyles
line

Number of people undertaking sufficient physical activity

Physical activity or exercise can improve physical health and reduce the risk of developing several diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Physical activity can have immediate and long-term health benefits, but most importantly regular activity can improve quality of life.

As part of the South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance system (SAMSS), participants aged 16 years and over were asked ‘How many days in the past week have you done vigorous or moderate physical activity for a total of at least 60 minutes (this could be made up of different activities over the course of the day, for example walking, cycling, playing sport at lunch time, exercise class or household chores)?’

The extent of weekly physical activity was then determined by the following definition: ‘sufficient physical activity was defined as 150 minutes total of walking, moderate or vigorous activity in the past week, with vigorous activity weighted by a factor of two to account for its greater intensity’. Therefore, respondents could then be categorised into three different groups including (i) those who have achieved sufficient activity, (ii) those who were active, but did not meet the ‘sufficient’ definition of weekly physical activity and (iii) those who did not participate in any physical activity.

For the assessment of weekly physical activity levels in 2014-15, SAMSS interviewed 660 respondents in the City of Onkaparinga, and a total of 5649 South Australians (30)

Data analysis

In 2014-15, nearly 80 per cent of City of Onkaparinga respondents were participating in weekly physical activity, however, only 50 per cent of respondents were achieving sufficient weekly physical activity, and a further one fifth were not physically active at all (Figure 1).

 

Figure 1: Proportion of respondents by reported level of physical activity, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by reported level of physical activity, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15 
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

In 2014-15 the proportion of South Australian respondents in each of the three levels of physical activity achieved was very similar to the proportions observed in the City of Onkaparinga (Figure 2). In 2014-15, only one per cent more South Australians were achieving sufficient physical activity when compared with City of Onkaparinga respondents. There was a slightly greater proportion of City of Onkaparinga residents who were considered active, but not sufficient (0.4 per cent more), and those who were not physically active at all (0.7 per cent more), when compared with the proportion of South Australians.

Figure 2: Proportion of respondents by reported level of physical activity, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by reported level of physical activity, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15
South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

Trend analysis

CWM sufficient activity trend analysis

Since 2008-09 there has been very little change between all three levels of physical activity for both the City of Onkaparinga and South Australia (Figures 1 and 2). There has been a 17.4 per cent increase in the proportion of City of Onkaparinga respondents that were not physically active at all, with a 3.5 per cent decline in the proportion who were sufficiently active between 2008-09 and 2014-15 (Figure 1). This trend was similar for the South Australian respondents, whereby when comparing 2008-09 with 2014-15, the proportion of respondents who did not participate in any physical activity increased by 12.1 per cent, together with a 4.9 per cent decrease in the proportion of respondents who were sufficiently active (Figure 2).

Policy implications

The observed decline in sufficient activity will continue to be addressed through the actions of the Sport and Active Recreation Strategic Management Plan 2014-19. The City of Onkaparinga will strive to provide a high level of active recreation services by facilitating the redevelopment of indoor sporting complexes and increasing activity opportunities. Furthermore, the City of Onkaparinga will work towards enhancing and broadening active recreation opportunities linked to beaches, foreshore areas and recreation park destinations, through ball games, beach volley ball, exercise stations, running tracks and scooter/bike activities. The City of Onkaparinga will also improve strategies related to the promotion of participation in sport and active recreation and increase community awareness about the benefits of active sport and recreation. The implementation of these initiatives will continue to achieve Community Plan Objective 2.1 Health, Active Lifestyles.

 

Body Mass Index

Body mass index (BMI) is a measurement that evaluates the relationship between weight and height to determine whether an individual is in a healthy weight range. While it is not a direct measure of excess body fat, it does provide an estimation to determine whether an adult is overweight or obese. BMI is calculated by dividing an individual’s weight (kg) by height squared (m2). The BMI ranges for weight classification in adults are:

  • Underweight: BMI of less than 18.5
  • Healthy weight range: BMI between 18.5 and 24.9
  • Overweight: BMI between 25.0 and 29.9
  • Obese: BMI of more than 30.0

As part of the South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance system (SAMSS), participants aged 18 years and over were asked their weight and height. In 2014-15 SAMSS interviewed 645 respondents in the City of Onkaparinga and a total of 5258 South Australians (30).

Data analysis

In 2014-15 the largest proportion of City of Onkaparinga residents were overweight, followed by healthy weight, obese, and as expected, a very small proportion of residents were considered underweight (Figure 3). 

Figure 3: Proportion of respondents by body mass index, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by body mass index, City of Onkaparinga, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

The distribution of the South Australian BMI range was similar to that observed for the City of Onkaparinga, with the greatest proportion of the population classified as overweight, followed by healthy weight, obese, and then a very small proportion was considered underweight (Figure 4). When compared with South Australia, in 2014-15 the City of Onkaparinga has a higher proportion of people considered obese (3.4 per cent more) and overweight (0.9 per cent more), while there was a smaller proportion of residents in the healthy weight range (4.4 per cent less) (Figures 3 and 4). 

Figure 4: Proportion of respondents by body mass index, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15

CWM Proportion of respondents by body mass index, South Australia, 2008-09 to 2014-15
Source: South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (30)

 

 

Trend analysis

CWM bmi trend analysis

Between 2008-09 and 2014-15 there has been a 41.3 per cent increase in the proportion of City of Onkaparinga residents considered obese, a 15.1 per cent reduction in the proportion of residents considered healthy weight and a reduction in residents considered both overweight and underweight (decrease of 4.9 per cent and 23.9 per cent, respectively) (Figure 3).

Similarly, when comparing 2014-15 with 2008-09 for South Australia, there has been a 23.0 per cent increase in the proportion of respondents who are considered obese, and a reduction in the proportion of all three other BMI categories (Figure 4). The proportion of those considered overweight decreased by 6.3 per cent, the proportion of those considered health weight decreased by 4.7 per cent and those who were underweight decreased by 25.7 per cent.

Policy implications

There are a number of current initiatives facilitated and supported by the City of Onkaparinga that contribute to reducing the proportion of residents considered obese or overweight. Some of these include the healthy eating initiatives Magic Harvest, Community Gardens, Jamie Oliver’s Ministry of Food Pop-up Kitchen in Ramsay Place and the legacy of the previously implemented programs Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL) and the Healthy Active Lifestyles Onkaparinga (HALO). The City of Onkaparinga will also continue to partner with businesses and education providers to develop and implement programs that teach skills and knowledge to improve residents food purchasing and preparation behaviours, which ultimately aims to increase self-sufficiency and healthy eating choices.

The City of Onkaparinga also has a number of roles in the provision, facilitation and promotion of healthy active lifestyles programs that are outlined in the Sport and Active Recreation Strategic Management Plan 2014-19. In addition, the draft Coast and Natural Resources Strategic Management Plan aims to provide, facilitate and promote nature play initiatives, which provide a range of benefits in the health, wellbeing and intellectual development of children.

A further role for the City of Onkaparinga to contribute to reducing obesity may also include improved advocacy methods to better engage all levels of government to reinstate new, or further develop healthy active lifestyle programs similar to OPAL and HALO. Another initiative could include the facilitation of more fresh food markets or healthy food trucks throughout the city.


 

This indicator is linked to other strategies, plans and targets outlined below:

Government of South Australia South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets: 78. Healthy South Australians: increase the healthy life expectancy of South Australians.
79. Aboriginal healthy life expectancy: increase the average healthy life expectancy of South Australians.
82. Healthy Weight: increase by 5 percentage points the proportion of South Australian adults and children at a healthy body weight by 2017. 
83. Sport and Recreation: increase the proportion of South Australians participating in sport or physical recreation at least once per week to 50% by 2020.
line
Other State Strategies • Office for Recreation and Sport Strategic Plan 2013-15
• Eat Well Be Active Strategy for South Australia 2011-16
line
National Strategies: • National Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Australians
line

 

Top